Can cats eat broccoli?

can cats eat broccoli

Broccoli is an edible green plant in the cabbage family whose large flowering head is eaten as a vegetable.

The word broccoli comes from the Italian plural of broccolo, which means “the flowering crest of a cabbage”, and is the diminutive form of brocco, meaning “small nail” or “sprout”. Broccoli is often boiled or steamed but may be eaten raw.

Broccoli has large flower heads, usually green in color, arranged in a tree-like structure branching out from a thick, edible stalk.

The mass of flower heads is surrounded by leaves. Broccoli resembles cauliflower, which is a different cultivar group of the same species.

Can cats eat broccoli?

Let’s take a look at their nutritional data and find out more. By looking at what they contain we can make a good assessment as to whether they actually make a good food for them to eat rather than relying on the word of others.

In particular, their carbohydrate, acidic, water, sugar, salt, calcium, phosphorous, and fat content is of most interest as far as cats are concerned.

Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy 141 kJ (34 kcal)
Carbohydrates
6.64 g
Sugars 1.7 g
Dietary fiber 2.6 g
Fat
0.37 g
Protein
2.82 g
Vitamins Quantity %DV†
Vitamin A equiv.
beta-Carotene
lutein zeaxanthin
4% 31 μg
3% 361 μg
1403 μg
Thiamine (B1) 6% 0.071 mg
Riboflavin (B2) 10% 0.117 mg
Niacin (B3) 4% 0.639 mg
Pantothenic acid (B5) 11% 0.573 mg
Vitamin B6 13% 0.175 mg
Folate (B9) 16% 63 μg
Vitamin C 107% 89.2 mg
Vitamin E 5% 0.78 mg
Vitamin K 97% 101.6 μg
Minerals Quantity %DV†
Calcium 5% 47 mg
Iron 6% 0.73 mg
Magnesium 6% 21 mg
Manganese 10% 0.21 mg
Phosphorus 9% 66 mg
Potassium 7% 316 mg
Sodium 2% 33 mg
Zinc 4% 0.41 mg
Other constituents Quantity
Water 89.3 g

Summary

As you can see broccoli contains a huge amount of water, quite a bit of carbohydrate, phosphorus, acidic content and calcium, a hint of fat and a little sugar.

This means that they can eat a little broccoli but don’t feed them too much due to the amount of water, acidic content and calcium that it contains. If they eat too much broccoli, it could result in them getting diarrhea or sick.

One small tree of broccoli is quite sufficient for them to eat. They can eat it raw or cooked as long as it is cool and not hot. It is not a great food for cats to eat though as it doesn’t hold much nutritional value for cats.

Make sure it is washed thoroughly before you feed broccoli to them. Some cats may even enjoy it, however, it isn’t the most natural food for them to eat.

For more foods that cats can and can’t eat, check out our cat food list.

Reference

Wikipedia – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broccoli

Can Cats eat Eggplant?

can cats eat eggplant

Eggplant is also known as aubergine and is a delicate and tropical perennial which is often cultivated as a tender or half-hardy annual in temperate climates.

It has a spiny stem and its flower is white to purple in color with a five-lobed corolla and yellow stamens.

The fruit itself is egg-shaped with a glossy skin which is purple in color. Under its skin is a white flesh that has a meaty texture.

When the fruit is cut open, and the skin peeled back, the flesh turns brown rapidly.

It grows 40 to 150 cm (1.3 to 4.9 ft) tall, with large, coarsely lobed leaves that are 10 to 20 cm (3.9 to 7.9 in) long and 5 to 10 cm (2.0 to 3.9 in) broad. Semiwild types can grow much larger, to 225 cm (7.38 ft) with large leaves over 30 cm (12 in) long and 15 cm (5.9 in) broad. On wild plants, the fruit is less than 3 cm (1.2 in) in diameter, but much larger in cultivated forms: 30 cm (12 in) or more in length.

Can cats eat eggplant?

Let’s take a look at their nutritional data and find out more. By looking at what they contain we can make a good assessment as to whether they actually make a good food for them to eat rather than relying on the word of others.

In particular, their carbohydrate, acidic, water, sugar, salt, calcium, phosphorous, and fat content is of most interest as far as cats are concerned.

Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy 104 kJ (25 kcal)
Carbohydrates
5.88 g
Sugars 3.53 g
Dietary fiber 3 g
Fat
0.18 g
Protein
0.98 g
Vitamins Quantity %DV†
Thiamine (B1) 3% 0.039 mg
Riboflavin (B2) 3% 0.037 mg
Niacin (B3) 4% 0.649 mg
Pantothenic acid (B5) 6% 0.281 mg
Vitamin B6 6% 0.084 mg
Folate (B9) 6% 22 μg
Vitamin C 3% 2.2 mg
Vit E 2% 0.3 mg
Vitamin K 3% 3.5 μg
Minerals Quantity %DV†
Calcium 1% 9 mg
Iron 2% 0.23 mg
Magnesium 4% 14 mg
Manganese 11% 0.232 mg
Phosphorus 3% 24 mg
Potassium 5% 229 mg
Zinc 2% 0.16 mg
Other constituents Quantity
Water 92 g

As you can see eggplant contains a huge amount of water, a little phosphorus, a hint of calcium and fat, a little acidic content and sugar.

This means that eggplant is not a great food for them to eat but a few small pieces won’t hurt them. Two or three pieces at a time are quite sufficient for them. If they have a lot of it, then there is a risk that they will get diarrhea or get sick because of the sheer amount of water that eggplant contains.

The skin should not be eaten really and it is better for them just to eat the flesh.

There are much better foods for them to eat, because of the huge water content that it has.

For more foods that cats can and can’t eat, do check out our cat food list.

References

Wikipedia – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eggplant

Can cats eat butternut squash?

can cats eat butternut squash

Butternut squash is also known as butternut pumpkin or gramma and is a type of winter squash which grows on a vine.

It has a tan-yellow skin and orange fleshy pulp. It has a compartment of seeds in its center.

When it has ripened, butternut squash becomes a deep orange color. A ripe butternut squash is also sweet and rich in its flavor.

It is technically a fruit, however, it is often described as a vegetable.

Butternut squash can be sauteed, toasted, pureed, roasted or mashed in various different culinary situations.

Can cats eat butternut squash?

Let’s take a look at their nutritional data and find out more. By looking at what they contain we can make a good assessment as to whether they actually make a good food for them to eat rather than relying on the word of others.

In particular, their carbohydrate, acidic, water, sugar, salt, calcium, phosphorous, and fat content is of most interest as far as cats are concerned.

Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy 188 kJ (45 kcal)
Carbohydrates
11.69 g
Dietary fiber 2 g
Fat
0.1 g
Protein
1 g
Vitamins Quantity %DV†
Vitamin A equiv.
beta-Carotene
67% 532 μg
39% 4226 μg
Thiamine (B1) 9% 0.1 mg
Riboflavin (B2) 2% 0.02 mg
Niacin (B3) 8% 1.2 mg
Pantothenic acid (B5) 8% 0.4 mg
Vitamin B6 12% 0.154 mg
Folate (B9) 7% 27 μg
Vitamin C 25% 21 mg
Vitamin E 10% 1.44 mg
Minerals Quantity %DV†
Calcium 5% 48 mg
Iron 5% 0.7 mg
Magnesium 10% 34 mg
Manganese 10% 0.202 mg
Phosphorus 5% 33 mg
Potassium 7% 352 mg
Zinc 2% 0.15 mg

Summary

As you can see butternut squash contains quite a bit of phosphorus, acidic content and calcium, a hint of fat and a lot of carbohydrates.

This means that butternut squash is absolutely fine for cats to eat in small amounts. Two to three small pieces at a time is more than sufficient for them. They do contain a reasonable amount of acidic and carbs which is why it’s not a good idea to feed them too much. Too much butternut squash may make them sick or get diarrhea.

Butternut squash can be fed to a cat either raw or cooked. If you feed it to them cooked, make sure it is sufficiently chilled for them to eat comfortably.

The skin and the seeds should be stripped away before you feed it to them as they are not great for cats to eat. There is a risk of them choking on the seeds if they eat them, so it is worth keeping them away from them.

For more foods that cats can and can’t eat, check out our cat food list.

References

Wikipedia – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butternut_squash

Can cats eat blueberries?

can cats eat blueberries

Blueberries are popular fruits that are sold in supermarkets and grocery stores around the world. They are versatile fruits that usually processed or sold fresh as infused berries, dried berries, juice, puree, or quick frozen fruit.

They can also be used in other culinary goods such as breakfast cereals, jams, jellies, muffins and snack foods, not to mention blueberry drinks such as blueberry wine.

Blueberries that are commercially grown are usually from a species that occur only in eastern and north-central North America.

 

Can cats eat blueberries?

Let’s take a look at their nutritional data and find out more. By looking at what they contain we can make a good assessment as to whether they actually make a good food for them to eat rather than relying on the word of others.

In particular, their carbohydrate, acidic, water, sugar, salt, calcium, phosphorous, and fat content is of most interest as far as cats are concerned.

Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy 240 kJ (57 kcal)
Carbohydrates
14.49 g
Sugars 9.96 g
Dietary fiber 2.4 g
Fat
0.33 g
Protein
0.74 g
Vitamins Quantity %DV†
Vitamin A equiv.
beta-Carotene
lutein zeaxanthin
0% 32 μg
80 μg
Vitamin A 54 IU
Thiamine (B1) 3% 0.037 mg
Riboflavin (B2) 3% 0.041 mg
Niacin (B3) 3% 0.418 mg
Pantothenic acid (B5) 2% 0.124 mg
Vitamin B6 4% 0.052 mg
Folate (B9) 2% 6 μg
Vitamin C 12% 9.7 mg
Vit E 4% 0.57 mg
Vitamin K 18% 19.3 μg
Minerals Quantity %DV†
Calcium 1% 6 mg
Iron 2% 0.28 mg
Magnesium 2% 6 mg
Manganese 16% 0.336 mg
Phosphorus 2% 12 mg
Potassium 2% 77 mg
Sodium 0% 1 mg
Zinc 2% 0.165 mg
Other constituents Quantity
Water 84 g

Summary

As you can see blueberries contain a huge amount of water, a hint of salt and calcium, a little phosphorus, a little acidic content and a lot of sugar and carbohydrates.

This means that cats can eat blueberries, but only one or two of them at a time. They contain too much water and sugar for them to eat too many of them. If they eat a lot of them, they will suffer from diarrhea or get sick. So do take care as to how many you feed them, that’s if your kitty will actually take to eating them as they are not the most attractive of foods for a cat to eat.

If they do take a liking to them, make sure they are washed thoroughly before you feed them a blueberry or two.

What about other blueberry foods such as blueberry jam?

Can cats eat blueberry jam?

Unfortunately, blueberry jam is too sweet for cats to eat as it contains too much sugar for them to handle. It should be avoided as a food for them.

For more foods that cats can and can’t eat, do check out our cat food list.

 

References

Wikipedia – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blueberry

Can cats eat acorn squash?

can cats eat acorn squash

Acorn squash is also called Des Moines squash or pepper squash and is a winter squash. It has distinctive ridges on its outside skin and inside it has flesh that is an orange-yellow color with a sweet taste.

The skin is usually a dark green color often with a single spot of orange on its side or its top. There are also newer varieties that have a glowing yellow color as well as varieties that are white in color.

They belong in the same species as other summer squashes as crookneck squashes and zucchini and its shape typically resemble an acorn.

Acorn squash comes from Central and North America.

It only usually lasts a few weeks in storage and so is one of the most perishable winter squashes.

Acorn squash is often baked but it can also be microwaved, steamed or sauteed.

It is also found stuffed with meat, rice or vegetables.

The seeds of an acorn squash are also eaten commonly.

 

Can cats eat acorn squash?

Let’s take a look at their nutritional data and find out more. By looking at what they contain we can make a good assessment as to whether they actually make a good food for them to eat rather than relying on the word of others.

In particular, their carbohydrate, acidic, water, sugar, salt, calcium, phosphorous, and fat content is of most interest as far as cats are concerned.

Amount Per 100 grams
Calories 40
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.1 g 0%
Saturated fat 0 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0 g
Monounsaturated fat 0 g
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 3 mg 0%
Potassium 347 mg 9%
Total Carbohydrate 10 g 3%
Dietary fiber 1.5 g 6%
Protein 0.8 g 1%
Vitamin A 7%
Vitamin C 18%
Calcium 3%
Iron 3%
Vitamin D 0%
Vit B-6 10%
Vitamin B-12 0%
Magnesium 8%

Summary

As you can see acorn squash contains a little calcium, a hint of salt, and fat.

This means that acorn squash can be eaten by cats and just like its close relative zucchini is pretty good for them to eat. It does not contain anything that is bad for them really.

The only problem is that it just doesn’t have anything that is particularly beneficial for them. So it is great for cats to have as a snack and to chew on, it just doesn’t have anything that is nutritious for them.

They can eat it raw or cooked. Just make sure that if fed cooked, it should be cooled to a chilled state.

Acorn squash should be cut up into small pieces that are easy for a cat to chew and ingest. Large chunks will be difficult for a kitty to chew on.

Just make sure the skin and the seeds are stripped away as they are not good for cats to eat. In particular, if a cat were to eat the seeds there may be a problem with choking.

For more foods that cats can and can’t eat, check out our cat food list.

Can cats eat acorns?

can cats eat acorns

Acorns are also called oak nuts and are the nut’s of oak trees and their close relatives. They usually contain a single seed and sometimes even two seeds and are enclosed in a leathery and tough shell. It is then borne in a cup-shaped cupule.

They measure between one and six centimeters long and 0.8 centimeters to 4 centimeters in breadth.

They take between 6 and 24 months to mature into fully grown acorns.

Can cats eat acorns?

Let’s take a look at their nutritional data and find out more. By looking at what they contain we can make a good assessment as to whether they actually make a good food for them to eat rather than relying on the word of others.

In particular, their carbohydrate, acidic, water, sugar, salt, calcium, phosphorous, and fat content is of most interest as far as cats are concerned.

Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy 1,619 kJ (387 kcal)
Carbohydrates
40.75 g
Fat
23.85 g
Saturated 3.102 g
Monounsaturated 15.109 g
Polyunsaturated 4.596 g
Protein
6.15 g
Tryptophan 0.074 g
Threonine 0.236 g
Isoleucine 0.285 g
Leucine 0.489 g
Lysine 0.384 g
Methionine 0.103 g
Cystine 0.109 g
Phenylalanine 0.269 g
Tyrosine 0.187 g
Valine 0.345 g
Arginine 0.473 g
Histidine 0.170 g
Alanine 0.350 g
Aspartic acid 0.635 g
Glutamic acid 0.986 g
Glycine 0.285 g
Proline 0.246 g
Serine 0.261 g
Vitamins Quantity %DV†
Vitamin A equiv. 0% 2 μg
Thiamine (B1) 10% 0.112 mg
Riboflavin (B2) 10% 0.118 mg
Niacin (B3) 12% 1.827 mg
Pantothenic acid (B5) 14% 0.715 mg
Vitamin B6 41% 0.528 mg
Folate (B9) 22% 87 μg
Vitamin B12 0% 0.00 μg
Vitamin C 0% 0.0 mg
Minerals Quantity %DV†
Calcium 4% 41 mg
Copper 31% 0.621 mg
Iron 6% 0.79 mg
Magnesium 17% 62 mg
Manganese 64% 1.337 mg
Phosphorus 11% 79 mg
Potassium 11% 539 mg
Sodium 0% 0 mg
Zinc 5% 0.51 mg
Other constituents Quantity
Water 27.9 g

Summary

As you can see corns contain a lot of carbohydrates, fat, acidic content, water, and phosphorus, a hint of salt, a little calcium

Unfortunately, cats cannot eat acorns at all. Because of the sheer amount of acidic content, water, carbs, and phosphorus content that they contain, if they are ingested by your kitty they can cause them to have diarrhea or be sick.

If they are going to eat any acorns then they are likely to only eat one at most so it won’t do much damage. But eating more than that will result in your kitty suffering a more detrimental effect on their health.

There is also the risk of choking and the acorn splintering off in the throats as they try to chew it causing damage to their insides. If you do find that they have eaten a lot of them then it would be a good idea to consult your veterinary surgeon to check up on them.

If they have shown a deterioration of health then this should be an urgent priority. For the most part though they will not be interested in such foods. So when they are out and about they will tend to just ignore them as most of the time they just don’t appeal to their taste buds.

There is also the risk of them having bad bacteria on them from being outside and exposed to that which is bad for a cat.

For more foods that cats can and can’t eat check out our cat food list.

 

References

Wikipedia – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acorn

Can cats eat apricots?

can cats eat apricots

Apricots are a fruit or a drope that is very similar to that of a small peach. They measure between 1.5-2.5cm in diameter and vary from orange to yellow in color. Sometimes they are tinged with red as well if exposed to the sun. They have a smooth surface or velvety with short hairs.

They have flesh which is firm but not juice and their taste can vary from tart to sweet.

Apricots contain a single seed which is enclosed within a stony and hard shell called a kernel or a stone

 

Can cats eat apricots?

Let’s take a look at their nutritional data and find out more. By looking at what they contain we can make a good assessment as to whether they actually make a good food for them to eat rather than relying on the word of others.

In particular, their carbohydrate, acidic, water, sugar, salt, calcium, phosphorous, and fat content is of most interest as far as cats are concerned.

Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy 201 kJ (48 kcal)
Carbohydrates
11 g
Sugars 9 g
Dietary fiber 2 g
Fat
0.4 g
Protein
1.4 g
Vitamins Quantity %DV†
Vitamin A equiv.
beta-Carotene
lutein zeaxanthin
12% 96 μg
10% 1094 μg
89 μg
Thiamine (B1) 3% 0.03 mg
Riboflavin (B2) 3% 0.04 mg
Niacin (B3) 4% 0.6 mg
Pantothenic acid (B5) 5% 0.24 mg
Vitamin B6 4% 0.054 mg
Folate (B9) 2% 9 μg
Vitamin C 12% 10 mg
Vit E 6% 0.89 mg
Vitamin K 3% 3.3 μg
Minerals Quantity %DV†
Calcium 1% 13 mg
Iron 3% 0.4 mg
Magnesium 3% 10 mg
Manganese 4% 0.077 mg
Phosphorus 3% 23 mg
Potassium 6% 259 mg
Sodium 0% 1 mg
Zinc 2% 0.2 mg
Other constituents Quantity
Water 86 g

This means that apricots are not good for cats to eat a lot of. If they have one or two pieces they will be fine but they contain too much sugar, carbs and acidic content for them to eat a lot of.

Eating foods with a lot of sugar in them will mean that there is a possibility that they could get diabetes because their bodies just can’t handle the sheer amount of sugar that comes from eating foods that contain a lot of sugar.

That’s in the long term, in the short term they are a possibility that they will get sick or get diarrhea of they have apricot as a food. It is definitely a food you should regulate them eating to ensure it is not to their detriment.

As mentioned earlier, just one or two pieces that have been cut up for them is quite sufficient.

Get rid of the atone before you feed it to them, the skin though is fine for them to eat.

For more foods that cats can and can’t eat, check out our cat food list.

 

References – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apricot

Can cats eat guacamole?

can cats eat guacamole

Guacamole is also known as guac in North America and is an avocado-based spread, dip, or salad. It was first made by the Aztecs in Mexico and became synonymous with Mexican cuisine and later American cuisine as a salad ingredient, condiment or dip.

It is made by mashing ripe avocados which have ripened with sea salt with mortar and pestle. Some recipes use other ingredients such as jalapenos, basis, coriander, pepper, cayenne, chili, lime juice or garlic not to mention sour cream or peas.

Guacamole can be made from avocados using traditional or unique recipes or can be purchased already made from supermarkets and grocery stores around the world.

Can cats eat guacamole?

Let’s take a look at their nutritional data and find out more. By looking at what they contain we can make a good assessment as to whether they actually make a good food for them to eat rather than relying on the word of others.

In particular, their carbohydrate, acidic, water, sugar, salt, calcium, phosphorous, and fat content is of most interest as far as cats are concerned.

Nutritional value per 100 g
Energy 670 kJ (160 kcal)
Carbohydrates
8.53 g
Starch 0.11 g
Sugars
lactose
0.66 g
0
Dietary fiber 6.7 g
Fat
14.66 g
Saturated 2.126 g
Trans 0
Monounsaturated 9.8 g
Polyunsaturated 1.816 g
Protein
2.00 g
Vitamins Quantity %DV†
Vitamin A equiv.
beta-Carotene
lutein zeaxanthin
1% 7 μg
1% 62 μg
271 μg
Vitamin A 146 IU
Thiamine (B1) 6% 0.067 mg
Riboflavin (B2) 11% 0.130 mg
Niacin (B3) 12% 1.738 mg
Pantothenic acid (B5) 28% 1.389 mg
Vitamin B6 20% 0.257 mg
Folate (B9) 20% 81 μg
Choline 3% 14.2 mg
Vitamin C 12% 10.0 mg
Vit E 14% 2.07 mg
Vitamin K 20% 21 μg
Minerals Quantity %DV†
Calcium 1% 12 mg
Iron 4% 0.55 mg
Magnesium 8% 29 mg
Phosphorus 7% 52 mg
Potassium 10% 485 mg
Sodium 0% 7 mg
Zinc 7% 0.64 mg
Other constituents Quantity
Water 73.23

As you can see guacamole contains a huge amount of water, quite a bit of phosphorus, a hint of calcium and sugar, a lot of acidic content, carbohydrates and fat.

This means that cats can eat a little of it but because of its acidic and water content, they shouldn’t eat too much of it. Eating too much will result in them getting sick or getting diarrhea. It also has no nutritional benefit for them either. If they are keen on eating it, a teaspoon’s worth of guacamole is quite sufficient for them to eat if they really want it.

But it is generally a food to avoid feeding them, there are much better foods to feed a cat.

If the guacamole contains other ingredients which are bad for cats such as jalapenos, garlic or chili then do avoid feeding to them.

For more foods that cats can and can’t eat, check out our cat food list.

References

Wikipedia – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guacamole

Can cats eat olives?

can cats eat olives

Table olives are usually classified by the IOC into three typical groups because of the ripeness that they achieve before they are harvested.

Black or ripe olives are usually picked when they are fully ripened at full maturity. They are usually black, purple, or brown colors.

Turning-color olives are usually picked when they are beginning to ripen when their color has just begun to change from green to multi-colored shades of brown or red.

Ripe or Black olives are usually picked when they are fully ripened at full maturity which is when they reach a black, brown or purple color.

Olives are usually cultivated for olive oil, fine wood, olive leaf, and the olive fruit. About 90% of all harvested olives are turned into oil, while about 10% are used as table olives

Can cats eat olives?

Let’s take a look at their nutritional data and find out more. By looking at what they contain we can make a good assessment as to whether they actually make a good food for them to eat rather than relying on the word of others.

In particular, their carbohydrate, acidic, water, sugar, salt, calcium, phosphorous, and fat content is of most interest as far as cats are concerned.

Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy 609 kJ (146 kcal)
Carbohydrates
3.84 g
Sugars 0.54 g
Dietary fiber 3.3 g
Fat
15.32 g
Saturated 2.029 g
Monounsaturated 11.314 g
Polyunsaturated 1.307 g
Protein
1.03 g
Vitamins Quantity %DV†
Vitamin A equiv.
beta-Carotene
lutein zeaxanthin
3% 20 μg
2% 231 μg
510 μg
Thiamine (B1) 2% 0.021 mg
Riboflavin (B2) 1% 0.007 mg
Niacin (B3) 2% 0.237 mg
Vitamin B6 2% 0.031 mg
Folate (B9) 1% 3 μg
Choline 3% 14.2 mg
Vitamin E 25% 3.81 mg
Vitamin K 1% 1.4 μg
Minerals Quantity %DV†
Calcium 5% 52 mg
Iron 4% 0.49 mg
Magnesium 3% 11 mg
Phosphorus 1% 4 mg
Potassium 1% 42 mg
Sodium 104% 1556 mg
Other constituents Quantity
Water 75.3 g

Summary

As you can see olives contain a little sugar and carbohydrates, a huge amount of acidic content, water and salt, a hint of phosphorus, a little calcium and a large amount of fat.

This means that olives are not a good food for cats to eat. This is due to the huge amount of acidic content, water, and salt that they contain. They are just not good for cats to eat at all. If they were to eat one or two then do keep an eye on them to make sure that they are okay. If they were to eat a lot of them they would need attention from a veterinary surgeon due to the ill effects that they would have on a cat.

They also do not have any nutritional benefit for a cat either.

Eating a lot of them will cause them to be sick unfortunately and so they should be avoided as a food.

For more foods that cats can and can’t eat, check out our cat food list.

 

References

Wikipedia – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olive

Can cats eat watermelon?

can cats eat watermelon

Watermelons are a popular and sweet fruit usually eaten across summer. They are usually eaten fresh in slices, or dices into fruit salads. They can also be juiced and drunk as a drink. It’s juice can be blended with other types of fruit juice. It can also be made into wine.

Its seeds have a slightly nutty flavor and can also be roasted or dried. The seeds can be ground into flour. They are eaten often as snacks in far eastern countries.

The rind can be eaten but they don’t taste that good and so are tended to be avoided.

Can cats eat watermelon?

Let’s take a look at their nutritional data and find out more. By looking at what they contain we can make a good assessment as to whether they actually make a good food for them to eat rather than relying on the word of others.

In particular, their carbohydrate, acidic, water, sugar, salt, calcium, phosphorous, and fat content is of most interest as far as cats are concerned.

Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy 127 kJ (30 kcal)
Carbohydrates
7.55 g
Sugars 6.2 g
Dietary fiber 0.4 g
Fat
0.15 g
Protein
0.61 g
Vitamins Quantity %DV†
Vitamin A equiv.
beta-Carotene
4% 28 μg
3% 303 μg
Thiamine (B1) 3% 0.033 mg
Riboflavin (B2) 2% 0.021 mg
Niacin (B3) 1% 0.178 mg
Pantothenic acid (B5) 4% 0.221 mg
Vitamin B6 3% 0.045 mg
Choline 1% 4.1 mg
Vitamin C 10% 8.1 mg
Minerals Quantity %DV†
Calcium 1% 7 mg
Iron 2% 0.24 mg
Magnesium 3% 10 mg
Manganese 2% 0.038 mg
Phosphorus 2% 11 mg
Potassium 2% 112 mg
Sodium 0% 1 mg
Zinc 1% 0.1 mg
Other constituents

Quantity
Water 91.45 g
Lycopene 4532 µg

Summary

As you can see watermelon contains a huge amount of water, a tiny amount of salt and fat, a little phosphorus, acidic content and calcium, quite a bit of sugar and carbohydrates.

This means that cats can eat watermelon. However don’t feed them too much due to the sheer amount of water it contains and its sugar content. A few chunks of watermelon is absolutely fine. Lots of slices of watermelon is not though!

Eating a lot of watermelon cat give them diarrhea and also affect them if they have diabetes due to the amount of sugar it contains.

Watermelon is actually good for the re-hydration of a kitty. It also contains good levels of vitamin A and C which is very good for a cat.

Make sure you take the seeds out though before you feed them watermelon as they may choke on them if they happen to swallow one.

Cats also should not eat the skin as it is just too rubbery for them to eat. Although if they happen to nibble it they will be fine. It’s just not the best thing for them to eat.

Just strip it away after you have cut up the watermelon for your cat and just give them the flesh.

For more foods that cats can and can’t eat, check out our cat food list.

References

Wikipedia – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Watermelon